What Does the New Year Hold for Private Practice Owners?

The beginning of the year is often the best time to reflect, and then look forward. After all, it’s kind of like Spring, where we get “New Chances”. Chances to compound upon the wisdom of our years, do some things better, do others differently while eliminating both stuff and activities which no longer serve us.

Make no mistake about it the impact of our choices seems to magnify with each passing year. And this is increasingly more apparent in a world which holds little room for error.

So, the question I have for you is what will be different for you and your practice in the New Year? Could it be your own health, focus, lifestyle, and private practice business activities? New experiences which help you grow? 

The question to ask yourself today is “Will I take advantage of all the new opportunities that are before me?”

Perhaps the best advice I was given years back is to spend quiet time NOW to work on improving your lifestyle and thus the quality of your life and those around you, then mold your practice to fully support your own dreams and visions. And then vow to do this again every quarter.

As difficult as it may be at times, I respectfully submit there is no better time to be in private practice. Your compassion, your skillsets and yes just the ability to be 100% patient focused while delivering all this as a physician truly is a priceless gift. 

To pull this off though really requires attention to your own design otherwise you’ll be forced to live with default as too many do. 

So please take these next few days to reflect and really enjoy whatever you like to do this time of year.

Jot some notes about what’s working for you right now and what isn’t. But most off all, just be sure your plan is laid out before January 2nd.

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  1 comment for “What Does the New Year Hold for Private Practice Owners?

  1. arthur gindn
    January 2, 2020 at 8:35 pm

    I thank you for letting me read about current problems. I am 85 and a retired neurosurgeon.

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