Irony: Worker at NYC hospital where nurses wear trash bags as protection dies from coronavirus

Who remembers the film Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl? They were discussing the fate of one of the other characters; how he died, and what was needed to lift the curse. It was a bit of comic relief and irony in the film. Similarly, this referenced article seems a bit ironic in that trash bags were used for hospital gowns, and a staff member needlessly died from the corona virus-like a piece of trash:

The shortage of safety gear at one Manhattan hospital is so dire that desperate nurses have resorted to wearing trash bags — and some blame the situation for the coronavirus death of a beloved colleague.

            Now isn’t it maddening? In 2020 with all the modern technology, trash bags were used as makeshift hospital gowns. Now, I’m sure science can say that at least it is a barrier, but how in 2020 have we come to such a point in the USA of all places? We’re supposed to have the best healthcare in the world. I try not to put more than one photo in the blog for ease of reading and formatting, but this you have to see:

“Nurses at Mount Sinai West, where Kelly worked, are being forced to wear trash bags due to the lack of protective gear there.”

From the article, this gentleman was a well-loved hard-working manager. Officials tied the lack of basic supplies there to the death of assistant nursing manager Kious Kelly, who tested positive for coronavirus about two weeks ago. Though the irony of trash bags is light-hearted, this virus is no joke. Not surprisingly, a spokesman for the hospital strongly disagreed, that they did not have the proper equipment and were not protecting their staff. Who amongst us has faced similar situations lately?

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Robert Duprey MD

Robert is a 2nd career physician (MD); a combat Veteran with the US Army; a former psychiatric nurse practitioner; an independent researcher; a medical writer; and now having passed USMLE Steps 1, 2CK, 2CS, and 3, is a residency applicant.