Natasha Sriraman MD

Dr. Sriraman, MD, MPH, FAAP, FABM, speaks around the country on various topics: breastfeeding, postpartum depression screening in pediatrics, narrative medicine/physician burnout, cultural competency/cultural differences in infant feeding and social determinants of health. She has specialized training in pediatric psychopharmacology. In addition to seeing patients, she is an associate professor of pediatrics at Eastern Virginia Medical School and teaches medical students and residents daily. She also holds a master's degree in public health from the University of Pittsburgh and has designed curriculum for public health training in pediatrics and breastfeeding training. She also serves as Adjunct Lecturer at the College of William & Mary where she teaches a class on health disparities.. Dr. Sriraman is frequently involved with legislative advocacy and has worked with the Governor's office on having May declared as Maternal Mental Health Month in Virginia. She has received numerous awards for her teaching and research. She has also received grants from Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and jointly from Williams & Mary College/Eastern Virginia Medical School. She has served on the board of National AAP-Section of Breastfeeding, and VA-AAP Chapter, and Postpartum Support Virginia. She is currently on the Board of Directors for Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine and The Eliza Hope Foundation.

What is a Provider?

The term “provider” levels distinctions and implies a uniformity of expertise and knowledge among health care professionals. The term diminishes those distinctions worthy of differentiation such as education, scope and range of ability. Generic terminology implies an interchangeability of skills that is inappropriate and erroneous, as well as conferring legitimacy on the provision of health…

The Loss of Physician Respect

Physician Burnout—Over 54% of physicians experience it. In fact, the WHO now officially recognizes work “burnout” as an occupational phenomenon. The syndrome is included in the agency’s handbook of medical diagnoses, which guides health professionals around the world. Symptoms of burnout include: feelings of exhaustion, cynicism about one’s job, and difficulty doing the job successfully. Burnout is defined…

Trust Your Doctor about Vaccines

As a pediatrician, I deal with questions and concerns from parents regarding vaccines.  Despite my best efforts, some patients will not receive the needed vaccines, thereby putting them at risk for serious illness and even death.  Although I present the evidence that show the faulty link between the “MMR vaccine causes autism ” many parents still quote…

Physicians Need to Stop Doing Clerical Work

As physicians, we went to medical school to care for patients, put together a diagnostic puzzle, and give them our undivided attention. We wanted to help people when they were at their most vulnerable. I remember starting my first day as an actual doctor, a pediatric intern. I learned how to take a proper history…