Robert Duprey MD

Robert P. Duprey Jr studied medicine as a 2nd career medical student who went to medical school in his 40’s after honorable discharge and ‘retirement’ from 25 years in the US Military (USCG & US Army). He was a registered nurse (RN) with specialty training as a psychiatric RN in the US Army for 15 years. During this time he also became a Master’s level psychotherapist in 2002. While on US Army active duty he also became a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner while working full time in 2011. He served as a Psych NP on active duty, to include a combat tour in Iraq, until his ‘retirement’ in 2014 and moved to Philippines with his 3 children. At this time he started medical school overseas at Oceania University of Medicine based out of Samoa accredited by Philippine Accrediting Association of Schools, Colleges and Universities (PAASCU). He continued to work as a Psych NP throughout medical school to support his children and to not have to take out loans for medical school tuition. Originally from Rhode Island, he completed medical school clerkship rotations throughout the USA with a graduation in May 2019 earning the esteemed credential of MD. He has successfully completed USMLE Steps 1, 2CS, and 2CK. He will take Step 3 this September as he applies for Psychiatry Residency. Having been and RN, NP and now MD, he is a believer of Physician led multidisciplinary healthcare teams

Time: A New Study Found That the Time of Day Can Play a Significant Role in Whether a Patient Receives Screening for Breast or Colorectal Cancer

The study found that patients seen early in the morning were more likely to be referred for cancer screenings than patients who saw their primary care physician later in the afternoon.1 The study also found that patients who saw their physician later in the day were less likely to complete screening after receiving a referra.1…

A Brief Critical Read: Primary Care Provider Type – Are There Differences in Patients’ Intermediate Diabetes Outcomes?

“With growing evidence that the quality of care delivered by the professions is similar, this wide range in implementation of roles likely reflects organizational goals and cultures rather than the capacities of each profession. The results of this study suggest that physicians, PAs, and NPs can perform a variety of roles that can reflect the…

Homeopathic MYTH: US Homeopaths Claim ‘Therapies’ Prevent Measles and ‘Cure’ Autism

“An understanding of the basic function of the immune system is useful in order to understand both how vaccines work and the basis of recommendations for their use.”1(CDC)             So what do measles, mumps, and pneumococcal pneumonia have in common in 2019?  Well, after having spent 6 months on my last medical school rotations in a border…

Clinical Supervision: A Positive Thing For All Practitioners and Physicians

            So lots of social media about negative aspects of having to have clinical supervision and/or collaboration from individuals in states where nurse practitioners (NPs) are seeking full practice authority (FPA). I will state up front, there is no valid argument against those will lesser training to have clinical oversight and/or supervision and/or collaboration from those…

Patient Satisfaction: What’s the point?

Let’s have a little fun and compare The Cost of Satisfaction: A National Study of Patient Satisfaction, Health Care Utilization, Expenditures, and Mortality vs. A National Survey of Nurse Practitioners’ Patient Satisfaction Outcomes Look at these results: “Findings from a new research study led by Thomas Kippenbrock, a nursing professor at the University of Arkansas,…

Update in Primary Care: Depression in Primary Care May Actually be a Vitamin D Deficiency

BACKGROUND Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant worldwide health problem, and often seen in primary care with comorbid medical problems such as hypertension, chronic pain, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, asthma, and others. There is a high instance of patients seen in primary care to where depression is either contributing to the physical health ailments, sequela…

Kratom: The Down and Dirty

First came Spice1, then Bathsalts,2then Krokodil,3and now Kratom.4  All considered designer drugs by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and all with significant risk factors that today’s physicians need to be aware. Emergency room physicians and psychiatrists especially, but all physicians need to be aware as with the earlier designer drugs Spice and Bathsalts, Kratom…