True Doctor Heroes

ebola

The Ebola outbreak, if you don’t know, is bad and now two doctors have been affected:

The doctor leading Sierra Leone’s fight against the worst Ebola outbreak on record died from the virus on Tuesday, the country’s chief medical officer said.  The death of Sheik Umar Khan, who was credited with treating more than 100 patients, follows those of dozens of local health workers and the infection of two American medics in neighboring Liberia, highlighting the dangers faced by staff trying to halt the disease’s spread across West Africa. The contagious disease, which has no known cure, has symptoms that include vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding. The fatality rate of the current outbreak is around 60 percent although Ebola can kill up to 90 percent of those who catch it.  The 39-year-old Khan, hailed as a “national hero” by the Health Ministry, had been moved to a treatment ward run by the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the far north of Sierra Leone.

And there is this:

Dr. Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.  Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease. The Texas-trained doctor says he is “terrified” of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency.

These are true medical heroes.

Douglas Farrago MD

Douglas Farrago MD is a full-time practicing family doc in Forest, Va. He started Forest Direct Primary Care where he takes no insurance and bills patients a monthly fee. He is board certified in the specialty of Family Practice. He is the inventor of a product called the Knee Saver which is currently in the Baseball Hall of Fame. The Knee Saver and its knock-offs are worn by many major league baseball catchers. He is also the inventor of the CryoHelmet used by athletes for head injuries as well as migraine sufferers. Dr. Farrago is the author of four books, two of which are the top two most popular DPC books. From 2001 – 2011, Dr. Farrago was the editor and creator of the Placebo Journal which ran for 10 full years. Described as the Mad Magazine for doctors, he and the Placebo Journal were featured in the Washington Post, US News and World Report, the AP, and the NY Times. Dr. Farrago is also the editor of the blog Authentic Medicine which was born out of concern about where the direction of healthcare is heading and the belief that the wrong people are in charge. This blog has been going daily for more than 15 years Article about Dr. Farrago in Doximity Email Dr. Farrago – [email protected] 

  4 comments for “True Doctor Heroes

  1. Lee
    August 2, 2014 at 7:00 pm

    A lot of people are praying for Dr. Brantley’s recovery and for his continuing good health. He may hold the secret for a vaccine within his body and, if so, many lives will be saved because of him. He is a true hero, a selfless physician and an inspiration to all of us.

  2. Pat
    August 1, 2014 at 11:42 am

    Amen.

  3. DrBonz
    August 1, 2014 at 9:54 am

    The two US healthcare missionaries are Dr. Brantly and Nancy Writebol.

    True heroes indeed.

    “Writebol, of Charlotte, N.C., has been given an experimental serum to treat the highly contagious virus.

    “There was only enough for one person. Dr. Brantly asked that it be given to Nancy Writebol,” said Samaritan’s Purse president Franklin Graham, son of legendary evangelist Billy Graham.

    Brantly, 33, a father of two from Forth Worth, Tex., received a life-saving blood transfusion from a 14-year-old Ebola survivor he had treated, Graham said.

    Brantly’s wife, Amber, said she’s praying that her husband beats the disease.”

    I would hope that these two heroes be remembered in all of our prayers tonight.

  4. DrHockey
    August 1, 2014 at 8:54 am

    So sad.
    So very sad.

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