AAFP’s Progress

I just read this article from the exiting AAFP President, Michael Munger MD, on his year-end report.  They do it every year at around the same time as the big yearly convention (AAFP FMX).  I was there in New Orleans for it but I didn’t go to the event. I just crashed it to have a DPC Alliance party.  Anyway, feel free to see how much “progress” was done by the AAFP over the past year by reading his article yourself but here is my take what was accomplished:

  1. Payment (higher pay for FP)- ummm, not so much
  2. Practice Transformation (reducing administrative burden)  – ummm, not so much
  3. Workforce (getting students to go into FP) – ummm, not so much
  4. Clinical Expertise (stopping attempts to intrude on the patient-physician relationship) – ummm, not so much

So, in conclusion, I am not sure what the AAFP did.

Direct Primary Care, by the way, accomplishes:

  1. Better pay
  2. Much, much less administrative burden
  3. Gets medical students excited about family medicine
  4. Improves the patient-physician relationship 1000 fold

Lastly, how about that MOC issue?  Where was the AAFP in stopping this charade?  That’s right, they make a ton of money off it.  Crickets.

I’ll guess I just have to wait until next year’s puppet puts out his “progress” report so I can see more of the same. Until then I will tell you once more that I believe DPC is the ONLY hope for the future of family medicine.

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Douglas Farrago MD

Douglas Farrago MD is a full-time practicing family doc in Forest, Va. He started Forest Direct Primary Care where he takes no insurance and bills patients a monthly fee. He is board certified in the specialty of Family Practice. He is the inventor of a product called the Knee Saver which is currently in the Baseball Hall of Fame. The Knee Saver and its knock-offs are worn by many major league baseball catchers. He is also the inventor of the CryoHelmet used by athletes for head injuries as well as migraine sufferers. Dr. Farrago is the author of four books, two of which are the top two most popular DPC books. From 2001 – 2011, Dr. Farrago was the editor and creator of the Placebo Journal which ran for 10 full years. Described as the Mad Magazine for doctors, he and the Placebo Journal were featured in the Washington Post, US News and World Report, the AP, and the NY Times. Dr. Farrago is also the editor of the blog Authentic Medicine which was born out of concern about where the direction of healthcare is heading and the belief that the wrong people are in charge. This blog has been going daily for more than 15 years Article about Dr. Farrago in Doximity Email Dr. Farrago – [email protected] 

  4 comments for “AAFP’s Progress

  1. RSW
    October 17, 2018 at 11:49 am

    “Practice Transformation (reducing administrative burden)”

    PLEASE be more accurate in your use of meaningless catch phrases and insurer-generated talking points.

    Practice Transformation is translated as “increasing administrative burden.”

  2. RSW
    October 17, 2018 at 10:00 am

    Every year, I think that it is impossible for the AAFP to elect a president who is more clueless, more brain-dead, more brown-nosing than the previous one.

    Every year I am proved wrong.

  3. Randy
    October 17, 2018 at 9:36 am

    Well they “kind of” addressed MOC:

    https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/903212?nlid=125547_426&src=WNL_mdplsfeat_181016_mscpedit_fmed&uac=37590PN&spon=34&impID=1770938&faf=1

    They are offering an option where instead of taking the exam you can do open book online assessments. You still have to pay your yearly blood money, er, dues but there’s no extra charge for the assessment. I think this is a positive since the exam is one-size-fits-all and expensive, and the online assessments will be much more convenient.

  4. Seneca
    October 17, 2018 at 8:23 am

    A little OT but…

    I just got my AAFP bill: $450 to AAFP plus $395 to my state chapter. They then try to add a “voluntary” contribution of $50 to the AAFP foundation. As professional society dues go, this is not too bad until one considers the do nothing outcomes described in Dr. Doug’s post, as well as the many AAFP actions which are actually contrary to the member’s interest. Color me dissident, but I can’t fund this stuff any longer.

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