Authentic Medicine Gazette

Enjoy our most current issue of the most popular medical e-newsletter on the internet.

Blogs and Thoughts for July 13th to July 19th:

Here is what we had this past week

  1. Disposing Meds by Steven Mussey MD
  2. $76,000? Nope.
  3. Country Roads by Pat Conrad MD
  4. MIPS vs. MOOPS
  5. What Healthcare Bill Would Work?
  6. Oh, No, They Put Kenny In The Bladder
  7. Quote of the Week: Mark Zuckerberg

 

1. Disposing Meds by Steven Mussey MD

July 19, 2017

The issue is worse than that.  See this.

 

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2. $76,000? Nope.

July 18, 2017

When John McCain had his eye surgery that delayed the Senate vote on healthcare you just knew that it was going to be fodder for the critics.  Well, here it is:

If John McCain were uninsured, his surgery could have cost $76,000

Not exactly. First of all, no one really knows what the cost of the surgery would have been since there is NO transparency.  Would you buy a television or a car without knowing the price?  Healthcare is a fantasy world created by these idiots in Congress who have been in cahoots with the insurance industry.

If McCain had one of the health ministries (MediShare, CHM, etc.) then the price, from my experience with my patients, would have been dropped significantly. Using a similar example from someone I know, his cost would have come to about $50K and the health ministry would have paid it all.  Even better, the $26K savings would have been applied to his $5K deductible so it would have cost McCain nothing.  Would a regular insurance do that?

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If McCain had a bare bones plan or catastrophic plan then his monthly fees would have been very reasonable (see these short term plans at United) and his out of pocket cost would have been his deductible or about $10K.  Who could afford $10K you say?  Well, I pay more than that in a year with my monthly premium and that is before my deductible. And I am not alone.

This article is bogus.  I don’t want to say “fake news” but how about hyperbole news or embellished news?

There is an answer.  Let the free market work.  And take away the special heath coverage for Congress as well.

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3. Country Roads by Pat Conrad MD

July 17th, 2017

Well, I guess this is a different spin on it…

The Senate is pretzeled into a fine mess, with Dems shrieking about the GOP slaughtering hundreds of thousands with Medicaid cuts, and wimpy Republicans believing them.  Last October, the Kaiser Family Foundation predicted that Medicaid spending GROWTH would decrease from spending 10.5% to 4.5%, an electoral design of ObamaCare, wherein the federal share of spending would very conveniently drop just as the Great Compassionate was to leave office.  Congressional Republicans claim that their ObamaCare Lite will only slow the growth of Medicaid, leaving plenty of slop in the trough and more deficit and debt as far as the eye can see.  Add to that the billions more the Trump Administration is promising to fight opioid addiction, which will achieve the twofer of further punishing docs, while wasting more taxpayer money.

Never to leave a heart un-bled, Yahoo News has an innovative way to scare us all over any potential cut in this massive welfare program.  If we flirt with cutting Medicaid, this could threaten opioid addicts’ survival in West Virginia.  The article begins with a sob story over an ambulance crew being helped with a flat by a roadside mechanic save, only to then go to his house and save his OD’ing daughter.  That Lifetime Channel setup then leads to the real meat:  the EMS service “pays the bills largely through patient insurance — which in this mostly poor, rural area is Medicaid, a program that could see massive cuts under the health care bill championed by Senate Republicans anxious to deliver on their campaign promise of repealing the Affordable Care Act.”  They also fear the loss of the state grant that buys Narcan, even as that drug’s price has spiked.  I wonder if the drug maker saw a spike in demand as cover for a price jack?  After all, it worked for EpiPens, the Mylan CEO responsible being none other than the daughter of West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin.  But I digress…

The EMS director laments, “If there are more Medicaid cuts, and no other help, this would be catastrophic for us, I don’t know if we could survive. We are talking about a potential situation where people would call 911, and there would be no one to help, whether it’s an overdose or a heart attack or a car accident or a broken hip. There would be no one. Can you imagine?”

Yes, as the EMS medical director in a very rural county with plenty of drug addicts, I certainly can imagine that a poor area can only provide scant resources over which different patient groups will compete.  And yes, I imagine without a blank check without end, some folks will actually die for lack of rapid medical attention.  The Hatfields vs. McCoys have now become the Cardiacs vs. the Addicts.  And what response does this silly author elicit?

“Not only are rural health care providers heavily dependent on Medicaid, many of those covered by Medicaid are the ones being treated for drug abuse. According to the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, roughly 50,000 of those who are covered through the Medicaid expansion were treated for substance abuse last year — a number many state officials expect to increase amid a drug crisis that appears to be getting worse by the day.”  I read that as journalistic extortion, flatly threatening that if we don’t increase Medicaid funding (with money we don’t have), there will be even more untreated addicts prowling the backyards.

It is arguable that the existence of Medicaid has abetted and encouraged many self-destructive behaviors, including inappropriate demand for and access to opioids, often provided by the very docs who now worry they would be cut off from the government teat.  This story is another example of single-wing emotionalism that overpowers other serious questions.  For instance, who is going to pay for all of this?

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4. MIPS vs. MOOPS

July 16th, 2017

This just in:

A congressional agency, MedPAC, recently issued its June report highlighting the need to improve the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track part of the Quality Payment Program (QPP) by reducing administrative burden and increasing the importance of positive patient health outcomes.

Here is the funny part.  Does anyone believe a plan using terms such as “merit based”, “incentive payment” and “quality payment” would ever be able to reduce administrative burden?

No!

Add to this that they still want to INCREASE the importance of positive patient health outcome?

Who thinks up this crap?

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5. What Healthcare Bill Would Work?

July 15th, 2017

I am no economist but my job as a direct primary doctor has proven that the free market works. Even more importantly, it proves that the insurance companies are needed very rarely.  They don’t need to navigate your care.  They don’t need to negotiate prices for you.  They don’t need be called “your healthcare provider”.  They are there to be a safety net when a catastrophe happens.  That should be all.  Consumers can bring prices down if they are left to their own devices.

With all this I still don’t know what EXACT plan will work but I know we are in the right direction if the insurers are pissed off about it.  Remember, they LOVED Obamacare!

This article in the Washington Post was titled Health insurers have been strangely quiet about undoing Obamacare. Until now.   It went on to say:

Cruz and Lee’s amendment, called the “consumer freedom amendment,” would allow insurance companies to sell cheap health plans that don’t meet the Affordable Care Act’s coverage requirements as long as insurers also agree to sell a plan that does. For example, an insurer could sell a skimpy plan without maternity coverage or reject people with certain preexisting conditions — so long as they sell a plan that doesn’t do those things. The idea, endorsed by Vice President Pence, is that healthy people would be able to buy only the coverage they want.

But in a letter to lawmakers and a document circulating on Capitol Hill, health insurers’ trade groups said that policy would destabilize the insurance marketplaces, cause premiums to rise unsustainably for people with chronic health conditions and leave fewer and fewer insurers selling plans — all the hallmarks of a death spiral.

“I’m writing to make clear my view on how the ‘Consumer Freedom Option’ is unworkable as it would undermine preexisting condition protections, increase premiums and destabilize the market,” Scott Serota, president and chief executive of the BlueCross BlueShield Association, wrote to Cruz and Lee.

I call bulls%t on the insurance trade groups.  They are worried about only one thing and that is their profits. I only hope that this plan would put them in a death spiral!

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6. Oh, No, They Put Kenny In The Bladder

July 14th, 2017

Just some of the fun we used to have with the Placebo Journal.  BTW, the foley balloon in the top picture makes Kenny’s head and the big prostrate makes up his bladder.

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7. Quote of the Week: Mark Zuckerberg

July 13th, 2017

“In a world that’s changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.”

Mark Zuckerberg

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UNTIL NEXT TIME, KEEP SMILING, KEEP LAUGHING AND KEEP OUT OF THE SAMPLE CLOSET!

Douglas Farrago MD

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  75 comments for “Authentic Medicine Gazette

  1. Dennis Kabasan
    April 27, 2017 at 10:23 am

    Doug,
    I ordered the Cryohelmet for my sixteen year old daughter, who sustained a concussion, with brief loc, after being struck in the forehead by a soccer ball, in a school match, two weeks ago. She’s been wearing the helmet, as recommended, one hour at a time, since it arrived three days ago. Her pediatrician is following her. She only tolerates a few classes each day, d/t frontal and temporal headaches and extreme tiredness. Sleep helps her. Is there any benefit to longer wear-time? Thanks.

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    • Doug Farrago
      April 27, 2017 at 10:31 am

      See my email to you

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  2. April 12, 2017 at 2:52 pm

    For some reason, my version of Authentic Medicine is delivered with comments from 2011 and 2012.

    Any notion of what may be going on?

    Thanks.

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    • Doug Farrago
      April 12, 2017 at 3:55 pm

      none

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  3. John Comis, DO
    May 30, 2012 at 11:34 am

    Please encourage the KOM to join his friends at QC13.

    7
    (…of the lemons)
    PS the healthcare system is so terrible it is beyond any further comment.
    Peace,
    John

    1+
    • Doug Farrago
      May 30, 2012 at 12:27 pm

      I will try.

      1+
    • au-digit
      January 26, 2017 at 3:33 pm

      The Bush you quote was #41.

      1+
  4. Gary Gaddis
    May 20, 2012 at 7:43 pm

    Regarding our Federal government, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius, and the growing gap between CMS perceptions and reality, here is my sarcastic “Sound Bite” suitable for the brief attention span of our electronic news media:

    “Since the Department of Justice is headed by an attorney, and the leader of the Federal Reserve is an economist, then how is it logical that the Secretary of Health and Human Services is also headed by an attorney?”

    Does anyone else agree with me?

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    • Kristina Berger MD
      May 21, 2012 at 7:31 am

      There are too few physicians in politics. Is it because we dont have the stomach for it, or another reason? I know if there were more of us as policy makers, the healthcare system in this country would improve greatly.

      1+
      • Simon Cummings
        May 23, 2012 at 8:59 am

        My vote is for Doug and not the type of physician represented by the Cardiologist who told me that he wasn’t interested in cardiac rehabilitation cos there’s no money in it!

        2+
    • Judy
      May 24, 2012 at 8:58 pm

      No, I think that it is correct for a lawyer to head the Department of Health & Human Services. Only a lawyer can read the volumes of crap they put out as regulations and find a loophole way to still make a living; only a lawyer can repeatedly find a way to let someone die and it be due to no fault attachable to him; only a lawyer can write voluminous policies that effectively help only a select few of his supporters and require the rest of the populace to pay for it except himself; and only a lawyer can sit passively by and provide no useful assistance to a group of sick, needy people but still require them to pay for his service. If you will think on these comments for a few minutes, you may change your opinion.

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      • Bill
        June 4, 2012 at 9:22 pm

        Hey Doug ! I am a lawyer. never made more than $85K /year and spent my entire career in trenches helping people, most who did not have much money, with problems, many of them caused by their own bad decisions and choices. and I love your journal.
        Given the wide range of attitudes, opinions and incomes among doctors do you really want a politically-connected MD in charge ? maybe an orthopedist ? xoxo

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        • Doug Farrago
          June 4, 2012 at 10:43 pm

          The description “politically-connected” should remove that person from contention immediately.

          3+
        • Dr Bonz
          June 21, 2017 at 8:29 am

          Dear Bill.

          F*** You.

          Signed,

          An orthopedist.

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    • Jeff
      February 22, 2017 at 3:14 pm

      I agree, absolutely, that HHS should be headed by a physician.

      What about having an advanced practice nurse in that role?

      But (God help us) not an attorney, a chiropractor, a homeopath, a naturopath, a shaman, or a faith healer!

      On second thought, a shaman would be better than a lawyer any day.

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    • Jeff Palmer
      February 22, 2017 at 3:16 pm

      I agree, absolutely, that HHS should be headed by a physician.

      What about having an advanced practice nurse in that role?

      But (God help us) not an attorney, a chiropractor, a homeopath, a naturopath, a shaman, or a faith healer!

      On second thought, a shaman would be better than a lawyer any day.

      0
    • John A Goldman, mD
      March 4, 2017 at 3:10 pm

      thank goodness in 2017 it is a physician

      1+
  5. Alan Levine
    May 9, 2012 at 9:03 am

    You have bemoaned our lowly position in hospitals, commenting how few recognized our contributions on Physician Recognition DAY. In what I feel is a further diminution of what we do, my hospital is now celebrating Nurse Recognition WEEK!!!! How far we have fallen………….

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    • Doug Farrago
      May 9, 2012 at 2:53 pm

      I agree

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      • Jack Forbush
        May 23, 2012 at 12:10 pm

        Ditto

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    • Common Sense
      May 30, 2012 at 4:54 pm

      So you’re denigrating nurses in an attempt to rally support for your plight? It is just as easy to argue that since nurses spent 7 times more time with patients, theyre deserving of their week.

      Or, you know, we could all just stop getting butthurt over who has the longest display of solely symbolic “appreciation” and get back to working as the team we were intended to be.

      We’re your knights and you’re our Earls. There is nothing to be gained by making besouring diatribe. Be good to your staff and your patients and you’ll have more appreciation and recognition than your little heart can handle.

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      • Doug Farrago
        May 30, 2012 at 5:11 pm

        You really need to have read the thread completely before making that comment. Please check out the blogs on how Doctor’s Day has been totally dismissed. Maybe then you will understand how we feel. This is NOT about doctors against nurses. It really is about administrators.

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      • Doug Farrago
        May 30, 2012 at 5:12 pm

        You missed the point on this. It is about Doctor’s Day being totally dismissed by administrators. Please read those blogs.

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        • Alan Levine
          May 31, 2012 at 8:56 am

          That was exactly my point. In recognition of out efforts several years ago my hospital–a level 3 teaching hospital–gave chocolate bars (small ones) to the docs. Nurses this year received flowers and other shows of appreciation.

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          • JoAnne Fox
            June 8, 2012 at 7:23 pm

            Acknowledgement of a job well done would have been nice. I got a scoop of hot cocoa mix, repackaged in a baggie, with a little note attached telling me how wonderful nurses are.

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  6. Doug Given
    April 25, 2012 at 5:29 pm

    What a screw job from the lovely IRS on the Mandate.

    1+
  7. Judy
    April 18, 2012 at 10:05 am

    think you should run for President, as long as you will continue to keep up this site after you win!

    1+
  8. Dave Hoffman
    February 29, 2012 at 11:20 am

    Great thoughts as always, Doug!

    Is there a way to start new comment threads each time you post a new entry?

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    • Doug Farrago
      February 29, 2012 at 12:31 pm

      Each entry is a blog and has their own comment section

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      • t mcglone
        April 4, 2012 at 8:25 pm

        Having “served” for 15 years, those are finely edited comments fit for civilian consumption .

        0
  9. February 29, 2012 at 8:53 am

    today’s (feb 28, 2012) gazette was one of your best. some might say that your gazette is merely entertainment. i however, enjoy the articles with their kernel of truth/fact at the center and your encouragement for us to critically examine the field of medicine that we are a part of. the top ten signs that a hospital stay isn’t going well is what we see all our careers. uphoric for gout patients who like beer and ujerky for cardiac patients and the statin report were particularly good reading. i don’t know how you find the time or energy to do this. i was usually totally exhausted by the middle to end of my workday. thanks again.

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    • Doug Farrago
      February 29, 2012 at 9:06 am

      thanks, dennis! I appreciate the feedback and I am truly flattered.

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  10. Angi Wall DO
    February 9, 2012 at 9:18 pm

    I’m with Doug on the dietary/diabetes. It’s not often you catch those guys looking good in a bikini and munching on carrots.

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  11. Dr. Veronica Friel
    January 25, 2012 at 4:20 pm

    More! More!! Doug, keep it coming!!!

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  12. Robert Bosl, MD
    January 25, 2012 at 1:27 pm

    Regarding relationship of AD & DM, and comment that DM is dietary–too simplistic and likely wrong. We know about dysmetabolic syndrome & PCOS etc. which is genetic, DMS causes weight gain and subsequent DM. Consider whether strong relationship of DM to increased risk of AD is also genetic predisposition to both rather than one causing the other.

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    • Doug Farrago
      January 25, 2012 at 2:06 pm

      100% disagree. Predisposition is not a certainty. How can you NOT think DM is dietary related?

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      • Robert Bosl, MD
        February 1, 2012 at 4:12 pm

        My earlier comment may have been oversimplified–just tried to point out that some legit. MD’s believe in insulin resistance as a cause of some obesity issues than the result thereof, and it is conceivable that the “insulin resistance gene” may also play a role in development of Alzheimer’s.

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    • Bridget Reidy
      March 8, 2012 at 6:49 am

      Ever consider the relationship between Alzheimer’s and diabetes might be iatrogenic brain damage from hypoglycemia? I’m always shocked at how lightly my patients consider the risk of it.

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      • March 16, 2012 at 12:13 am

        May I suggest that the dementia with chronic diabetes isn’t Alzheimer’s, it is more likely to be due to the vasculopathy that accompanies non-well controlled diabetes or elderly age + diabetes. So the relationship is between DEMENTIA and diabetes, not Alzheimer’s Disease and diabetes. The fact that most elderly diabetics are vasculopaths, and the recurring theme in medicine that the brain depends on a constant supply of glucose and oxygen to function well, and that vasculopathy impairs oxygen and glucose delivery, is much more plausible than recurrent hypoglycemia.

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  13. Scott Miller, MD
    January 25, 2012 at 12:34 pm

    I work in urgent care and when I get home at night I am too tired to exercise. I find that the exercise I get from going back and forth in order to finish the articles in your journal gives me the physical exercise I need to stay healthy and sane. Thanks, Doug! Could you get me a beer when you go to the kitchen?

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    • Doug Farrago
      January 25, 2012 at 2:08 pm

      You got it!

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  14. Allyagottadois
    January 18, 2012 at 8:55 am

    If I can print it out in its’ entirety, I can leave it casually around the hospital. Mailroom, Medical floors, ICU, ER, surgical suites, administrative offices, JACHO. Because All I’ve got to do is: everything everybody tells me to do.

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  15. Dr. Bill Ameen
    January 1, 2012 at 11:31 am

    Hey Dr. Doug,
    To start the new year right, this ticks me off! I was belatedly reading the 11/4/11 issue of THE WEEK, an article about the Top 1% wage-earners. It takes annual earnings of $516,000 to qualify. Guess what? One out of six of the Top 1% is “in medicine”…I suppose some could be CEO’s of Big Pharma, but I suspect a large number are like the pediatric surgeon who heads the AMA and lives overlooking Central Park, and probably every orthopedist. Sorry, but I believe that anybody who makes that kind of dough either 1) inherited it, 2) stole it, or, as with most surgeons, sports figures and actors, 3) was grossly overpaid (as by insurance companies).

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    • Doug Farrago
      January 1, 2012 at 12:32 pm

      agreed

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  16. bill lorentz
    December 28, 2011 at 11:25 am

    I am a recent professor emeritus from a well known university medical school. For a number of years I worked with administration as an associate chief of staff. We spent considerable time and effort reviewing patient satisfaction scores using a well known national company and were quite excited that ours were consistently higher than most othere and certainly higher than I thought was reasonable.
    Bottom line-we discovered that the administrator in charge of managing the satisfaction suvery was “doctoring” our results. When we changed over to a more honest effort our scores dropped significantly. However, no one in administration was happy with our new lower scores and the subsequent need to address the outcomes.

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  17. David Devonis
    December 16, 2011 at 11:17 am

    Impressed that a lot of teachers are reading this material. Your site is the Writing on the Wall. Keep it coming!

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    • Doug Farrago
      December 16, 2011 at 1:35 pm

      Thanks!
      Doug

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  18. Dr. Bill Ameen
    December 15, 2011 at 10:46 pm

    Hey Dr. Doug, Heard that due to droughts affecting the peanut crop the price of peanut butter will go up. There’s a worsening shortage of PCP’s, so guess what? They’re paying us less..and less…and less. Also, latest Medical Economics has lead article about MOC. I was gritting my teeth reading remembering when you published the ABIM chief’s salary at $600,000. I’m sure ABFP CEO’s isn’t far behind. Where are the studies showing MOC (or even boards) make any difference in our performance? Finally, get “The Parking Lot Movie” on DVD. It’s a hysterically funny documentary about the parking lot behind The Corner at U.Va that will remind you of your days there!

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    • Doug Farrago
      December 16, 2011 at 5:04 am

      Thanks for the great points, Bill! Will need to get that DVD, as well. On one of my first dates with my future wife she remembers me checking all over the ground for parking lot tickets that were cheaper than the one I had in my hand. I was a class act.

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    • Dr. Veronica Friel
      January 25, 2012 at 4:16 pm

      Peanut butter prices going up? At COSTCO, the price of the large-size Jiffy Peanut Butter remains the SAME – the large-size is simply 8 oz. smaller.

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    • Connie Severin
      February 8, 2012 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks so much for adding that bit about the movie. I just ordered it off Amazon. I worked at UVa Med Cen from 1980-1985 and remember the strip and the parking behind it (apparently pre-Farina days). I remember some sort of parking honor system and some lot Nazis from back then too, but obviously predating when this documentary is set. It was about the only parking within a mile of campus too, so finding any spot at all was a miracle. I’m looking forward to the video. Thanks for the heads up.

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  19. Mary K Freel
    December 9, 2011 at 7:08 am

    RE: Grading Dr. on patient performance. Can you grade me if I work in a factory stamping out parts? Absolutely!! If the part doesn’t meet specifications then I’ve failed. Can you grade me on my patient’s health performance? Absolutely not!! I can only control a small part of what goes into a patient’s health and as studies have shown patients often pay for the dr. advice and then do nothing or the opposite. What a wonderful world it would be if when the dr. told his patient to lose weight and quit smoking they went right out and did those things. I was a nurse for 22 years and a teacher for 10 and in both professions I was the one who got blamed for whatever didn’t go right–whether it was poor scores on tests and the patient not getting better faster. Until people take ownership in their own health and realize that they are the number one reason that their health doesn’t improve the overall health of this nation will not improve and so our health care costs will continue to rise.

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  20. Bridget Reidy MD
    December 8, 2011 at 10:44 pm

    I agree with the teacher and have always been suspicious of both of our “quality” grading.

    The recent issue of AMA News gave opinions of practicing docs on lots of little issues but NONE on their main article on why small practices (aren’t they usually run by docs?) aren’t getting EMR’s. Gee 15% more pay for 50% more work – why wouldn’t we bite? I wonder if it’s a censored rag. Thank you Doug for validating our voices.

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    • JoAnne Fox
      June 8, 2012 at 7:32 pm

      Where do you find doctor owned small practices?? Most everyone around here is owned by one of the two hospital systems, and one has the gall to proclaim itself “not for profit” – I guess if you don’t mention the wholly owned subsidiaries they don’t count.

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      • Doug Farrago
        June 8, 2012 at 8:27 pm

        Hopefully you will find them in the future

        0
  21. Pat Nagle
    December 7, 2011 at 11:45 am

    I enjoy your site. I appreciate your heartfelt concern for patients and your irritation at the “solutions” suggested/mandated by outsiders (e.g. politicians). What strikes me most of all are the similarities between the world of medicine and the world of education, in which I spent 40+ years, working from K-graduate schools.

    Although the history, dynamics, and focuses are different,
    healthcare and education get pushed around by folks who don’t know what the hell they’re talking about, from Presidents, Congresspeople, media, on up, and the bottom line is always the bottom line, not the needs of patients and students.

    Your tirades against administrators parallel my feelings about the “consultants” and “foundations” who infest educational policymaking at every level. The last ones consulted are the frontline teachers and docs. And of course, the politicians and business moguls take no responsibility for the culture and economy they’ve helped create which lead to the problems in both areas.

    I don’t always agree with you (I’m adamantly for universal/single payer healthcare), but I appreciate your struggle. Keep up the good work.

    1+
    • Doug Farrago
      December 7, 2011 at 12:39 pm

      Thanks for some great feedback! And the similarities are eery.

      Doug

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    • Frank J. Rubino MD
      December 14, 2011 at 6:55 pm

      We do have much in common. “No child left behind” where the teacher is held responsible for the sucess of each and every child no mater how functional or dysfunctional is the child’s family.

      “Pay for performance” reguardless of how cooperative a patient is with diet & exercise and with their medication regimine for hypertension, diabetes etc.

      If one wants to make a lot of money in a short period of time, one should become a “consultant” to to school districts or to health care organizations. Expensive advice with out the responsibility. Charge a lot and then get out of town.

      1+
    • pat nagle
      December 21, 2011 at 12:50 pm

      Pardon me for doubledipping, but I forgot to mention that no legislator/congressperson has ever begged to be put on merit pay/pay for performance. Obviously, legislating doesn’t lend itself to factory models of evaluation. So why do medicine and education? The things that count aren’t measurable, and the measurable things don’t count.

      1+
      • Judy
        January 4, 2012 at 9:26 am

        hey, Pat, hope you don’t have a patent on your last line! that is about to become my ‘signature statement’ on my sign-offs!

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        • Richard W. Mondak
          March 28, 2012 at 1:56 pm

          I think several of us are going to “borrow” that line (of course we’ll give credit to whomever coined that phrase — whoever that is)

          1+
  22. John Chase
    December 7, 2011 at 9:11 am

    I would prefer your stories to run in their entirety rather than “read more”. Very irritating to have to go back and forth

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    • Doug Farrago
      December 7, 2011 at 10:08 am

      Ok, will work on it.
      Doug

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      • Greg Salard
        December 8, 2011 at 2:35 am

        I have to agree. Not only is it irritating, it can be confusing when you have to …

        Read More >>>

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        • Doug Farrago
          December 8, 2011 at 3:31 am

          LOL. Will work on it

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          • thea
            December 14, 2011 at 8:00 am

            Would like more written stories/blogs etc, do not have sound card on computer so can’t hear any of these videos..they kinda lose their punch without sound?

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          • Doug Farrago
            December 14, 2011 at 8:14 am

            Understandable. I had some videos done already and needed to get out a few extra this week. Won’t always be like that.

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          • Chris
            December 15, 2011 at 11:20 am

            Dear Doug,

            Not only do I want full articles on the page and written articles instead of videos, but I also want to have $100 deposited into my bank account each time I click onto your sight. And world peace.

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          • Doug Farrago
            December 15, 2011 at 11:25 am

            Done and done.

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          • tom walsh
            January 11, 2012 at 7:52 am

            These same people who can’t fathom going “back and forth” to read an article are the same ones who had difficulty with ‘butterfly” ballots in the 2000 elections in Florida.
            I have been enjoying your articles for quite a while and have no problems with the layout. Keep up the great work!! And, thanks.

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          • Doug Farrago
            January 11, 2012 at 7:54 am

            Thank you, Tom!

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          • Connie Severin
            February 8, 2012 at 1:09 pm

            Thanks for the new format! Jumping between responses and articles was a nuisance. I like being able to read everything in only one, maybe two spots at one read. It also makes it easier to check on new entries to the comments all at once, rather than having to check for each separate article.

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        • Richard W. Mondak
          February 22, 2012 at 12:21 pm

          I have a short attention span, so reading part of the article and assuming I know what is being stated is par for the course for me. I often shoot par – 36 on the first 5 or 6 holes – so why play more?

          I don’t mind procrastining to READ MORE>> later

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      • Ariel
        December 8, 2011 at 8:58 pm

        Agree with Mr. Chase. Thanks for looking into it!

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        • Sharon
          December 28, 2011 at 10:10 am

          I totally agree with Chris!

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